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Security Measure

Know the sounds of fire safety

Know the sounds of fire safety
Posted on 10/01/2021
Is there a beep or chirp coming from your smoke or carbon monoxide alarm? Knowing what these sounds mean can save you, your home and your family! Make sure everyone you live with understands the sounds of alarms and knows how to respond. Check out these general tips from the National Fire Prevention Association, then learn the sounds of your smoke and carbon monoxide alarms by checking the user guide or searching the brand and model online.

SMOKE ALARMS

  • A continued set of three loud beeps means smoke or fire. Get out, call 911 and stay out.
  • A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be changed.
  • Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its useful life and the unit must be replaced. All smoke alarms must be replaced after 10 years.

CARBON MONOXIDE (CO) ALARMS

  • A continuous set of four loud beeps means carbon monoxide is present in your home. Go outside, call 911 and stay out.
  • A single chirp every 30 or 60 seconds means the battery is low and must be replaced.
  • Chirping that continues after the battery has been replaced means the alarm is at the end of its life and the unit must be replaced. Your alarm may have another “end of life” sound — these vary by manufacturer.

MEET THE NEEDS OF EVERYONE IN YOUR HOME

Make sure your alarms can alert everyone you live with, including those with sensory or physical challenges.

Install a bedside alert that responds to the sound of smoke and CO alarms. A low frequency alarm can wake a sleeping person with mild to severe hearing loss.


Published Oct. 1, 2021